Group trumps individual intelligence – under right conditions

Group trumps individual intelligence – under right conditions

Groups of people can be more than the sum of the individuals – but only if the conditions inside them allow the individuals to shine. In 2010, MIT released their findings that collective intelligence of the groups they studied explained 40% of their performance. That’s a lot. And it didn’t matter how intelligent the individuals inside these groups were. Makes sense. We have experienced how the capacity of group of people has been defined – and in many cases, limited by the most dominant person – isn’t this right?

Customer Service in Health

Customer Service in Health

The power of the customer is growing and disrupting the health and aged care industry. Now one would expect that an industry that is built of people, for people, by people – such as health and aged care, would have no problem responding to this. But lo. This is not always the case. In fact, measuring ‘patient experience’ is a relatively new concept. I explore the reason behind it in this blog post.

Don’t be the wall that workers need to find their way around

Don’t be the wall that workers need to find their way around

Managers and clinicians in public health are so busy they simply do not have time to think of better ways of working, of learning new ways of working that would make their work easier, more effective and more efficient. They are stuck in a busyness vortex that is keeping them stuck in time – and yet the demands on their time are increasing and changing. They are so fixated on getting things done on time, that they can’t stop to reflect if these things are the right things, or if it is possible for someone else, or something else, to do these things.

The Tight Rope of Healthcare

The Tight Rope of Healthcare

Our world is beset with problems or conundrums that seem to be impossible puzzles to solve.  Pull one string and another part unravels. Push one block and out pops another.  In public healthcare, we have been given the puzzle of providing world class care to a growing number of people, within a capped budget, in accordance with standards and regulations, with the people we have who must comply with the rigid requirements of nurse:patient ratios.  A colleague of mine who works in the private sector made the incisive observation that it must be like asking them to do surgery with one arm tied behind their back.  I couldn’t agree more.  And I would add that the degree of difficulty has recently increased with the increase in scrutiny and reporting required by government. So it is like they have to manage the whole thing with their arm tied behind their back, walking along a tight rope over a swamp with alligators snapping up at them.  Oh, that is why many are feeling stressed, defeated and burned out.  They do not believe they can make any difference!  This state is inherently demotivating and can lead to feelings of insecurity and fear.  Under stress like this, we tend to go limbic (fear, fight and flight) – our pre-frontal cortex switches off so that we are unable to think creatively, rationally or strategically.   So, these people are managing with their arm tied behind their back, over a tight rope with alligators snapping at their toes, and have a blind fold. To persist and succeed in this environment, these managers must have a...