Learning fear and courage: What Mike Fanning’s story can teach us

Learning fear and courage: What Mike Fanning’s story can teach us

I listen with a detached interest to Mick Fanning depiction of his experience being attacked by a great white on 20 July. What was interesting was what I thought was a textbook demonstration of the idea that we learn fear.

Anyhoo, I wondered if this was the first time that Mick Fanning was courageous? I mean courage is feeling fear and doing it anyway right. I suspect part of his success on the big waves in the shark’s playground may owe to his absence of fear – his absolute belief that he’ll be fine. Yesterday tested that and may have provided him with a real sense of his mortality. He may have been as close to death as he has ever been – maybe not. I don’t know him so I am purely speculating.

Introducing The Diploma of Leadership and Management

The Australian Academy of Clinical Leadership is to deliver the Diploma of Leadership and Management (BSB51915). This Diploma was designed on the basis of feedback from the industry. It provides the business skills, clinical leadership and empowering mindset to make your managers multipliers.

How We Think of Stress Influences How We Feel

How We Think of Stress Influences How We Feel

Kelly McGonigal, a health psychologist, presented the findings of a study that followed 30,000 people in the USA for eight years. They found that people who experienced stress and believed it was bad for their health had a 43 percent higher chance of dying. On the other hand, people who experienced a lot of stress but did not view this as bad for them had less chance of dying — even less than people who experienced relatively little stress. You can change how you respond to stress by changing your view about stress There is a body of evidence showing that changing how stress is viewed can change the physiological response to stress, decreasing the negative responses and health consequences of stress. For example, the pounding heart rate and increased breath rate associated with a nerve-racking experience — if viewed as an indication that your body is preparing to perform at its highest instead of as a sign that you are not coping — not only make you feel more confident, but also make your blood vessels less likely to constrict – they stay relaxed. McGonigal explains that this state of heightened excitement, with the heart pounding but the blood vessels remaining relaxed is the same state produced by experiences of joy. The way you think about stress influences the negative consequences of it, and may reduce the negative health impacts as...